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The Talmud says that the purpose of wearing a kippah is to remind us of God, who is the Higher Authority "above us" (Kiddushin 31a).

A yarmulke (Yiddish) or Kippah (Hebrew) is a small cloth cap worn by Jews. Traditionally it was worn only by men, but in modern times the push for equality between the sexes in the practice of Judaism has lead some women to wear yarmulkes. Some Jews only wear yarmulkes while praying; others wear yarmulkes the entire day, making sure not to walk less than four cubits without head covering (especially outside). The basis for wearing a head covering is a story in the Talmud (tractate Shabbat)

It is perhaps the most instantly identifiable mark of a Jew.

In the world, it is customary to remove one's head covering when meeting an important person or entering a building, such as a school. In Judaism, putting on a head covering is a sign of respect.

According to some a kippot should cover the majority of the head.

Etymology According to some, the Yiddish word yarmulke originated from the phrase "yarei mei-elokah" (in awe of the Lord), in keeping with the principle that the yarmulke is supposed to reflect someone's fear of heaven.

Names: Kippot - Kippah - Yarmulke - Yarmulkah - Skull Cap - Jewish Hat
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Different Styles of Kippot
Click on the Picture to order the style you are interested in...

comes in different patterns, colors and sizes. 
Takes approx 4 hours to make one kippot.

Come in different colors and sizes
most common are black, white and blue


Bucharian Kippot

made of leather, comes in three sizes larger, medium and small and different colors
Knitted Kippot are generally made on size fits all. Can come in different patterns, colors 
Price range $15 to $3 Price range $5 to $3 Price range $25 to $6 Price range $7 to $5 Price range $20 to $5

Price will vary according to pattern, style, quality of materials used and where the is made

Basic Judaism - Spreading Torah at the Speed of Light

Jan 1, 2008